Friday, 19 November 2010

November in the garden

 You may be wondering what happened to all my lovely geraniums, which were blooming in the garden throughout the summer?  Well, they don't survive the frost so as soon as I hear a frost warning on the radio, they all have to come in.  Here are some of them!!


 I usually take six cuttings so that in the spring I have some new plants.  That way I can keep the balance with the colours, not too many red ones or all peach or whatever.

So I bring in 18 plants all together; six large, six medium and six babies.  It is hard to find room for them all.

 Patch is looking for her mouse, which she brought in, lost and is not sure now where it is.





Outside in the garden, all is looking very wintry.


 After a bit of encouragement, Jim has moved his ferns to the back of the border.


Here is a small clip from a TV programme which was very popular in the 1970's.  I love it.  It is one of my favourites.  It is called The Victorian Kitchen Garden and it is all about the year's events in a walled garden attached to a mansion.

Harry Dodson is the head gardener and he takes us through the year with helpful tips and knowledgeable insights into the life of a Victorian gardener who provides flowers, fruit and vegetables for the 'big house'.
Hope you like it.


9 comments:

  1. The Geraniums are still looking great, I admire you taking care of them indoors all winter through.
    The gardens are bare, in their dormant stage, not much to photograph, but we all know in the spring, the cycle begins once again.
    Do the ferns make it through the winter ?
    Loved the video, learned something new !
    Maybe Patch's mouse is under a Geranium ....oh dear ;)

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  2. It's a good idea to bring the geraniums indoors and have beauty on the drearier days. Even indoor foliage seems to lift the spirit. Have a great weekend.

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  3. I am such a terrible gardener! It never occurred to me to bring my geraniums in. Of course, with the munchkins toddling around I don't know that there's a spot for them...

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  4. Very organised for taking your geraniums indoors! I especially love the photo of the peach one on the side table next to the chair. Your house must smell amazing! I love the scent of geraniums--musty and earthy.

    And that video was fantastic! I love the older British tv shows, there's something much more authentic about them in some way.

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  5. Do you take cuttings now or in the Spring? Mine never seem to survive the winter indoors. I don't have enough light and they become spindly. My sister has better luck though. I can always get cuttings from her.

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  6. I adored that programme along with the Kitchen one.

    I didn't bring in my geraniums this year, I decided to start afresh next year, as they were years old.

    Gill in Canada

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  7. Looks like I need to do a post on propagating geraniums and keeping them going from year to year. Ok, I'll do that, next week. So glad you all enjoyed this post and the gorgeous video, which I also love.

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  8. Michelloui, Yes the peach one is especially pretty. That was a hanging basket in its summer life but now indoors till all fear of frost is past. I need to put a dish underneath that basket before I water it otherwise the water will go right through and ruin the table.
    Marlene, no I take cuttings in August, starting them off in the garden and keeping them through the winter so that they establish their roots.
    Gill, I remember your geraniums last year. It isn't always easy to keep them through the winter and sometimes, yes, you need to start again, but before you do, take your cuttings.
    BritinTn, yes the ferns go through the winter every year. They are very hardy. Patch never did find her mouse. I think I know where it went though. We have a mousehole behind the radiator!

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  9. Nice to see flowering plants indoors.
    And good to see that sunlight soaked plant.

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