Waulud Panto6
In 1997 I was working as a school secretary at an Infants School. It was decided to put on a pantomime (see below) for the children, who were all between four and seven years old. We did a sort of Cinderella and I was the King. Here I am in my stage clothing with one of the teachers who played the Queen of Hearts.
The children were told that a theatre company was coming to entertain them so they had no idea that the teachers would be performing for their delight. When they realised who they were watching, there was uproar and they absolutely loved it.
The headteacher was a good sport! Here he is as the wicked stepmother:
Waulud Panto
Yvonne was the fairy godmother:
Waulud Panto4
and Dorothy and Karen were buttons and the prince:
Waulud Panto3
but I give the prize for the best costumes to Flo and Jan who made some fantastic wigs, which transformed them into the ugly sisters:
Just look at the work that went into make the wigs from paper ringlets:
Waulud Panto1
At the end of the performance we all danced with the children to the Barbie song. Remember that one?
My days at the school lasted for thirteen years and I loved it until we got a new Headteacher and then it all went pear-shaped!
Have a love Sunday.
from Wikipaedia:
Pantomime (informally panto), is a type of musical comedy stage production, designed for family entertainment. It was developed in England and is generally performed during the Christmas and New Year season. Modern pantomime includes songs, slapstick comedy and dancing, employs gender-crossing actors, and combines topical humour with a story loosely based on a well-known fairy tale.[1] It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers.
Pantomime has a long theatrical history in Western culture dating back to classical theatre, and it developed partly from the 16th-century commedia dell’arte tradition of Italy, as well as other European and British stage traditions, such as 17th-centurymasques.[1] An important part of the pantomime, until the late 19th century, was theharlequinade. The pantomime is performed today throughout Britain and, to a lesser extent, in other English-speaking countries.